Classroom display: Maths Word of the Week

So, in a flash of inspiration as I try to prettify my classroom ready for September I came up with this. A little crowdsourcing of ideas on Twitter and I’ve managed to create a nice little display. Thanks to everyone who gave me inspiration (and taught me a few new words!). 

There are close to 60 words in the two files so plenty for an academic year or probably enough to last you the two years with a Key Stage 4 class without repeats. There’s a mix of words they’ll need to know as part of the curriculum alongside some lovely geekery. 

I’ve tried to pupil speak the definitions but if you see any glaring errors or typos please let me know in the comments or on Twitter

You can download the files here

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Creativity and Challenge in the Classroom

On Saturday I was lucky enough to be invited to a course that Ed Southall was running for his ITE students at Huddersfield Uni. This was being led by Don Steward. If you’re sat there reading this and saying “who?” you need to go and look at his excellent MEDIAN website which is full to the brim of challenging and rich activities ready for use in the classroom. Why are you still here? Go. And. Look. You back? I know! The best thing since sliced bread, right? No need to thank me. Needless to say Saturday was amazing so I wanted to jot down some thoughts.

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Meta Menu for Feedback

I took this idea from an INSET day we had with Barry Hymer (visit his website here – highly recommended for staff training, he’s done a few sessions with us and they’re always inspiring and full of practical advice) who has been doing a lot of training with us on the subject of open-mindsets. We need a specific, teaching and learning focus for our school’s co-coaching programme this year so I’ve gone with feedback and specifically the use of the “Meta Menu”.

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A shape problem to get your teeth into…

I’ve spent part of my day working on this problem, so thought I should blog about it.

A colleague had set an investigation for his Year 9 class to find the biggest tetrahedron that could be fit into a cube of side length 3cm.  In itself, this is a nice problem which pupils attempted initially via trial and improvement before realising that they could incorporate some Pythagoras’ calculations to help.  Pupils made models and hence practiced their skills of construction. Ace.  Fantastic.  Then another colleague who teaches the parallel Year 9 top set to me (NC levels 7a to 8a) began to think about how we could extend this task for our groups. That’s where it got more interesting…

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